ACL Repair 

About half of all injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament occur along with damage to other structures in the knee, such as articular cartilage, meniscus, or other ligaments.

Injured ligaments are considered “sprains” and are graded on a severity scale.

Treatment

Rebuilding the ligament

Most ACL tears cannot be sutured (stitched) back together. To surgically repair the ACL and restore knee stability, the ligament must be reconstructed. Your doctor will replace your torn ligament with a tissue graft. This graft acts as a scaffolding for a new ligament to grow on. Grafts can be obtained from several sources. Often they are taken from the patellar tendon, which runs between the kneecap and the shinbone. Hamstring tendons at the back of the thigh are also a common source of grafts. Sometimes a quadriceps tendon, which runs from the kneecap into the thigh is uncommonly used. You may choose to have a cadaver graft used.

There are advantages and disadvantages to all graft sources. You should discuss graft choices with your own orthopaedic surgeon to help determine which is best for you. Because the regrowth takes time, it is generally six months or more before an athlete can return to sports after surgery.

Procedure

Surgery to rebuild an anterior cruciate ligament is done with an arthroscope using small incisions. Arthroscopic surgery is less invasive. The benefits of less invasive techniques include less pain from surgery, less time spent in the hospital, and quicker recovery times. Unless ACL reconstruction is treatment for a combined ligament injury, it is usually not done right away. This delay gives the inflammation a chance to resolve, and allows a return of motion before surgery. Performing an ACL reconstruction too early greatly increases the risk of arthrofibrosis, or scar forming in the joint, which would risk a loss of knee motion.

Conditions

  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament
  • Bursitis – pes Anserive
  • Cartilage Injuries
  • Degenerative Joint Disease (Osteoarthritis)
  • Iliotibial Band Syndrome
  • Knee Sprains & Strains
  • Lateral Collateral Ligament Injuries
  • Loose Bodies
  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injury
  • Meniscus Tears
  • Osgood Schlaater Disease
  • Osteochondritis Dissecans
  • Osteonecrosis of the Knee
  • Patella Tendonitis
  • Patella Tendon Rupture
  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner’s Knee)
  • Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury (PCL)
  • Quadriceps Tendon Tear
  • Unstable Kneecap

Treatments

  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair (ACL)
  • Arthroscopic Chondroplasty
  • Arthroscopic Meniscus Repair
  • Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation
  • Bilateral Knee Replacement Surgery
  • Cartilage Transplant
  • Computer-Assisted Total Knee Arthrhoplasty
  • High Tibial Osteotomy
  • JOURNEY II Total Knee Replacement
  • Knee Arthroscopy
  • Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL) Repair
  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Repair
  • Meniscus Repair
  • MPFL Reconstruction of the Patella
  • OCE – Repair of the Osteochondritis
  • Partial Knee Replacement
  • Partial Knee Resurfacing
  • Partial Menisectomy
  • Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Repair
  • Revision Knee Surgery
  • Subchondroplasty
  • Total Knee Replacement ~ VERILAST
  • Total Knee Replacement ~ VISIONAIRE
  • Uni-Compartmental Joint Repair

Conservative Treatments

The Orthopedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide conservative treatment options for Knee conditions and injuries.

Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic

The Orthopaedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide comprehensive services to all members of the family.
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Disclaimer

The information found on this site is for general orthopedic purposes only. In a medical emergency please dial 911 or go to your nearest Emergency Room.