Core Decompression of the Hip

Osteonecrosis is a disease which ultimately results in the destruction of the joint if left untreated. It can affect any joint but occurs most frequently in the hip. There is no agreement as to what causes osteonecrosis, although a number of factors which contribute to the disease have been identified.

Different treatment options are available depending on how far along the disease has progressed. Advanced stages require a total hip replacement.

However, if the disease is detected early enough, other alternatives are available. One of these alternatives is a procedure called a core decompression.

Procedure

Core decompression is a procedure which entails drilling into the femoral neck, up into the necrotic area of the femoral head, to get the bone to heal faster. Theoretically, removing this central core of bone will lower the intraosseous pressure, which is thought to be one of the etiologies of the disease. When properly done, this procedure has minimal morbidity.

In reviewing the literature there is clearly a disparity of results in the use of core decompression regardless of the Ficat stage. In selected patients, core decompression may be indicated for stages 1 and 2. However, for more advanced stages (e.g. 3 and 4) the results are much less predictable. This procedure appears to be best suited for the stage 1 and early stage 2 hips in which pain relief and preservation of the femoral head are relatively predictable

Patients must remain non-weight bearing on crutches for 6 weeks following the procedure in order to prevent a small but real risk of fracture.

Conditions

  • Arthritis of the Hip
  • Avascular Necrosis (Osteonecrosis)
  • Bursitis of the Hip
  • Degenerative Joint Disease
  • Femur Shaft Fracture
  • Hip Fracture
  • Femoroacetabular Impingement Syndrome
  • Gluteus Medius Tear
  • Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip
  • Labral Tear of the Hip
  • Loose Bodies of the Hip
  • Muscle Strains of the Thigh
  • Snapping Hip
  • Strains of the Hip
  • Synovitis
  • Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip

Treatments

  • Bone Grafting of the Hip
  • Core Decompression of the Hip
  • Direct Anterior Hip Replacement
  • Femoroacetabular Impingement Surgery
  • Hip Arthroscopy
  • Minimally Invasive Hip Surgery
  • Posterior Total Hip Replacement – VERILAST
  • Revision Total Hip Replacement
  • Total Hip Replacement Surgery – VERILAST

Conservative Treatments

The Orthopedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide conservative treatment options for Hip conditions and injuries.

Treatment Highlights

VERILAST Hip Replacement Technology

Innovative Implant Design

Smith Nephew VERILAST hip replacement implant.

It’s important to remember that not every hip implant is the same. The Smith Nephew VERILAST Hip Technology is the one technology that directly addresses two of the most commonly cited concerns associated with hip replacement implants:

  • Implant Wear

  • Implant Fracture

Learn More

Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic

The Orthopaedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide comprehensive services to all members of the family.
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Disclaimer

The information found on this site is for general orthopedic purposes only. In a medical emergency please dial 911 or go to your nearest Emergency Room.