Ankle Sprains & Strains

An ankle sprain is an injury to one or more ligaments in the ankle. The ligaments of the ankle hold the ankle bones and joint in position. They protect the ankle joint from abnormal movements-especially twisting, turning, and rolling of the foot.

A ligament is an elastic structure. Ligaments usually stretch within their limits, and then go back to their normal positions. When a ligament is forced to stretch beyond its normal range, a sprain occurs. A severe sprain causes actual tearing of the elastic fibers.

Ligaments are bands of tissue, like rubber bands, that connect one bone to another and bind the joints together. In the ankle joint, ligaments provide stability by limiting side-to-side movement. Most ankle sprains occur on the outer aspect of the ankle.

Some ankle sprains are worse than others. The severity of an ankle sprain depends on whether the ligament is partially or completely torn and on the number of ligaments involved. Ankle sprains are not the same as strains which affect muscles rather than ligaments.

If there is a severe in-turning or out-turning of the foot relative to the ankle, the forces cause the ligaments to stretch beyond their normal length. If the force is too strong, the ligaments can tear.

You may lose your balance when your foot is placed unevenly on the ground. You may fall and be unable to stand on that foot. When excessive force is applied to the ankle’s soft tissue structures, you may even hear a “pop”. Pain and swelling result.

The amount of force determines the grade of the sprain:

A mild sprain is a Grade 1.
A moderate sprain is a Grade 2.
A severe strain is a Grade 3.

Grade 1 Sprain:
Slight stretching and some damage to the fibers (fibrils) of the ligament.

Grade 2 Sprain:
Partial tearing of the ligament. If the ankle joint is examined and moved in certain ways, abnormal looseness (laxity) of the ankle joint occurs.

Grade 3 Sprain:
Complete tear of the ligament. If the examiner pulls or pushes on the ankle joint in certain movements, gross instability occurs.

High Ankle Sprain

This condition occurs when the sprain injures the large ligament above the ankle that joins the two bones of the lower leg, the tibia and fibula, together. The fibula and the tibia are joined together by the syndesmotic ligament which runs from the knee down to the ankle.

Cause

A sprain occurs when your ankle is forced to move out of its normal position, which can cause one or more of the ankle’s ligaments to stretch, partially tear or tear completely.

Causes of a sprained ankle might include:

  • A fall that causes your ankle to twist
  • Landing awkwardly on your foot after jumping or pivoting
  • Walking or exercising on an uneven surface

Conditions

  • Achilles Tendonitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Adult Acquired Flatfoot
  • Ankle Sprains & Strains
  • Arthritis of the Foot & Ankle
  • Bone Spurs
  • Broken/Fractured Ankle
  • Calcaneous/Heelbone Fracture
  • Diabetic (Charcot) Foot
  • Fracture of the Talus
  • Lisfranc/Midfoot Injury
  • Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction
  • Sprained Ankle
  • Stress Fracture of the Foot & Ankle
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Tibia/Shinbone Shaft Fracture

Treatments

  • Achilles Tendon Repair
  • Ankle Arthroscopy
  • Ankle Fracture Surgery
  • Ankle Fusion Surgery
  • Ankle Reconstruction Surgery
  • Arthritis Surgeries of the Foot & Ankle
  • Cheilectomy
  • Common Ankle Surgery
  • Complex Ankle Surgery
  • Dislocation Surgery
  • Fractured Talus Surgery
  • Lisfranc Fracture Surgery
  • Posterior Tibial Tendonitis Surgery
  • Total Ankle Replacement Surgery

Conservative Treatments

The Orthopedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide conservative treatment options for Foot & Ankle conditions and injuries.

Symptoms

The amount of pain depends on the amount of stretching and tearing of the ligament. Instability occurs when there has been complete tearing of the ligament or a complete dislocation of the ankle joint.

Diagnosis

Physical Examination & Patient History

During your first visit, your doctor will talk to you about your symptoms and medical history. During the physical examination, your doctor will check all the structures of your injury, and compare them to your non-injured anatomy.  Most injuries can be diagnosed with a thorough physical examination.

Imaging Tests

Imaging Tests Other tests which may help your doctor confirm your diagnosis include:

X-rays. Although they will not show any injury, x-rays can show whether the injury is associated with a broken bone.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. If your injury requires an MRI, this study is utilized to create a better image of soft tissues injuries. However, an MRI may not be required for your particular injury circumstance and will be ordered based on a thorough examination by your Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic Orthopedic physician.

Treatment Options

Non-Surgical

Walking may be difficult because of the swelling and pain. You may need to use crutches if walking causes pain. Usually swelling and pain will last two days to three days. Depending upon the grade of injury, the doctor may tell you to use removable plastic devices such as castboots or air splints.

Most ankle sprains need only a period of protection to heal. The healing process takes about four weeks to six weeks. The doctor may tell you to incorporate motion early in the healing process to prevent stiffness. Motion may also aid in being able to sense position, location, orientation and movement of the ankle (proprioception). Even a complete ligament tear can heal without surgical repair if it is immobilized appropriately. Even if an ankle has a chronic tear, it can still be highly functional because overlying tendons help with stability and motion.

For a Grade 1 sprain, use R.I.C.E (rest, ice, compression and elevation):

Rest your ankle by not walking on it.
Ice should be immediately applied. It keeps the swelling down. It can be used for 20 minutes to 30 minutes, three or four times daily. Combine ice with wrapping to decrease swelling, pain and dysfunction.
Compression dressings, bandages or ace-wraps immobilize and support the injured ankle.
Elevate your ankle above your heart level for 48 hours.

For a Grade 2 sprain, the RICE guidelines can also be used. Allow more time for healing to occur. The doctor may also use a device to immobilize or splint the ankle.

A Grade 3 sprain can be associated with permanent instability. Surgery is rarely needed. A short leg cast or a cast-brace may be used for two weeks to three weeks.

Rehabilitation is used to help to decrease pain and swelling and to prevent chronic ankle problems. Ultrasound and electrical stimulation may also be used as needed to help with pain and swelling. At first, rehabilitation exercises may involve active range of motion or controlled movements of the ankle joint without resistance.

Water exercises may be used if land-based strengthening exercises, such as toe-raising, are too painful. Lower extremity exercises and endurance activities are added as tolerated. Proprioception training is very important, as poor propriception is a major cause of repeat sprain and an unstable ankle joint. Once you are pain-free, other exercises may be added, such as agility drills. The goal is to increase strength and range of motion as balance improves over time.

All ankle sprains recover through three phases:

Phase 1 includes resting, protecting the ankle and reducing the swelling (one week).
Phase 2 includes restoring range of motion, strength and flexibility (one week to two weeks).
Phase 3 includes gradually returning to activities that do not require turning or twisting the ankle and doing maintenance exercises. This will be followed later by being able to do activities that require sharp, sudden turns (cutting activities) such as tennis, basketball or football (weeks to months).

Medication
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be used to control pain and inflammation.

Long-term Outcome
If an ankle sprain is not recognized, and is not treated with the necessary attention and care, chronic problems of pain and instability may result.

Surgical

Surgical treatment for ankle sprains is rare. Surgery is reserved for injuries that fail to respond to nonsurgical treatment, and for persistent instability after months of rehabilitation and non-surgical treatment.

Arthroscopy
A surgeon looks inside the joint to see if there are any loose fragments of bone or cartilage, or part of the ligament caught in the joint.

Reconstruction
A surgeon repairs the torn ligament with stitches or suture, or uses other ligaments and/or tendons found in the foot and around the ankle to repair the damaged ligaments.

Conservative Treatment Options

  • Non-Operative Achilles Tendon Treatment

  • Non-Operative Ankle Sprain & Strain Treatment

  • Non-Operative Ankle Fracture Treatment

  • Non-Operative Ankle Arthritis Treatment

Treatment Highlights

Stryker_Total_Ankle_Implant

Innovative Implant Design

Stryker STAR Total Ankle Replacement implant is utilized by Dr. Todd Kim providing ankle replacement patients with innovative implant technologies.

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Responsive Implant Technology

The Stryker STAR Ankle Replacement Implant is the only mobile bearing total ankle replacement available in the US.

Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic

The Orthopaedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide comprehensive services to all members of the family.
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