Broken Collarbone

The collarbone (clavicle) is located between the ribcage (sternum) and the shoulder blade (scapula), and it connects the arm to the body.

The clavicle lies above several important nerves and blood vessels. However, these vital structures are rarely injured when the clavicle breaks, even though the bone ends can shift when they are fractured.

Treatments

Non-Surgical

If the broken ends of the bones have not shifted out of place and line up correctly, you may not need surgery. Broken collarbones can heal without surgery.

Arm Support
A simple arm sling or figure-of-eight wrap is usually used for comfort immediately after the break. These are worn to support your arm and help keep it in position while it heals.

Medication
Pain medication, including acetaminophen, can help relieve pain as the fracture heals.

Physical Therapy
While you are wearing the sling, you will likely lose muscle strength in your shoulder. Once your bone begins to heal, the pain will decrease and your doctor may start gentle shoulder and elbow exercises. These exercises will help prevent stiffness and weakness. More strenuous exercises can gradually be started once the fracture is completely healed.

Doctor Follow-Up
You will need to see your doctor regularly until your fracture heals. He or she will examine you and take x-rays to make sure the bone is healing in good position. After the bone has healed, you will be able to gradually return to your normal activities.

Complications
The fracture can move out of place before it heals. It is important to follow up with your doctor as scheduled to make sure the bone stays in position.

If the fracture fragments do move out of place and the bones heal in that position, it is called a “malunion.” Treatment for this is determined by how far out of place the bones are and how much this affects your arm movement.

A large bump over the fracture site may develop as the fracture heals. This usually gets smaller over time, but a small bump may remain permanently.

Shoulder Conditions

  • Bankart Lesion
  • Biceps Tendon Rupture
  • Broken Collarbone
  • Burners & Stinger
  • Bursitis
  • Chronic Shoulder Instability
  • Fracture of the Shoulder Blade
  • Frozen Shoulder
  • Labral Tear
  • Rotator Cuff Tear
  • Shoulder Arthritis
  • Shoulder Dislocation
  • Shoulder Impingement Syndrome
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Shoulder Separation
  • Superior Labrum Anterior to Posterior (SLAP)
  • Throwing Injuries[/li_item|

Shoulder Treatments

  • Acromioplasty
  • Arthroscopic Bankart Repair
  • Biceps Tendon Rupture Surgery
  • Biceps Tenodesis
  • Broken Collarbone Surgery
  • Bursitis/Shoulder Impingement Surgery
  • Closed Reduction Shoulder Surgery
  • Labrum Surgery
  • Instability Shoulder Surgery
  • Reverse Shoulder Replacement Surgery
  • Revision Shoulder Replacement Surgery
  • Rotator Cuff Repair
  • Shoulder Arthritis Surgery
  • Shoulder Arthroscopy Surgery
  • Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Treatment
  • Shoulder Separation Surgery
  • Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery
  • Throwing Injury Surgeries

Conservative Treatments

The Orthopedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide conservative treatment options for Shoulder conditions and injuries.

Surgical

If your bones are out of place (displaced), your doctor may recommend surgery. Surgery can align the bones exactly and hold them in good position while they heal. This can improve shoulder strength when you have recovered.

Plates and Screws
During this operation, the bone fragments are first repositioned into their normal alignment, and then held in place with special screws and/or by attaching metal plates to the outer surface of the bone.

After surgery, you may notice a small patch of numb skin below the incision. This numbness will become less noticeable with time. Because there is not a lot of fat over the collarbone, you may be able to feel the plate through your skin.

Plates and screws are usually not removed after the bone has healed, unless they are causing discomfort. Problems with the hardware are not common, but sometimes, seatbelts and backpacks can irritate the collarbone area. If this happens, the hardware can be removed after the fracture has healed.

Shoulder Treatment Highlights

Reverse Total Shoulder Replacement by Dr. Todd Kim

Dr. Todd Kim provides innovative shoulder replacement options to patients with shoulder joint compromise.

A standard total shoulder replacement is designed to work only if the rotator cuff muscles and tendons are in tact and working properly. If the rotator cuff muscles are not working properly, a Reverse Total Shoulder replacement is needed.

In a Reverse Total Shoulder replacement, the glenoid component is shaped like a ball and anchored to the scapula by screws. The humeral component then becomes the new socket of the joint and attaches to the upper end of the humerus.

The joint configuration of a Reverse Total shoulder replacement allows the patient to now us the deltoid muscle instead of the torn rotator cuff to lift the arm.

Total Shoulder Replacement by Dr. Todd Kim

Dr. Todd Kim provides innovative shoulder replacement options to patients with shoulder joint compromise.

Total shoulder replacement arthroplasty is a well-established surgery for restoring comfort and function to the arthritic shoulder.

In this procedure the arthritic ball is replaced by a smooth metal ball fixed to the arm bone (humerus) by a stem that fits within it.

The arthritic socket (glenoid) is resurfaced with high-density polyethylene prosthesis. Among the different surgical options this procedure appears to provide the most rapid and complete improvement in comfort and function for shoulders with arthritis.

Success requires technical excellence of the surgery and a commitment to the exercise program until the desired range of motion can be achieved comfortably.

Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic

The Orthopaedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide comprehensive services to all members of the family.
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