Meniscus Tear

Meniscal tears are among one of the most common knee injuries of Athletes. Particularly those who play contact sports, are at risk for meniscal tears.

A meniscus tear is a common knee injury. The meniscus is a rubbery, C-shaped disc that cushions your knee. Each knee has two menisci (plural of meniscus)-one at the outer edge of the knee and one at the inner edge. The menisci keep your knee steady camera.gif by balancing your weight across the knee. A torn meniscus can prevent your knee from working right.

A meniscus tear is usually caused by twisting or turning quickly, often with the foot planted while the knee is bent. Meniscus tears camera.gifcan occur when you lift something heavy or play sports. As you get older, your meniscus gets worn. This can make it tear more easily.

Cause

Sudden meniscal tears often happen during sports. Players may squat and twist the knee, causing a tear. Direct contact, like a tackle, is sometimes involved.

Symptoms

You might feel a “pop” when you tear a meniscus. Most people can still walk on their injured knee.

Many athletes keep playing with a tear. Over 2 to 3 days, your knee will gradually become more stiff and swollen.

The most common symptoms of meniscal tear are:

  • Pain
  • Stiffness and swelling
  • Catching or locking of your knee
  • The sensation of your knee “giving way”
  • You are not able to move your knee through its full range of motion

Without treatment, a piece of meniscus may come loose and drift into the joint. This can cause your knee to slip, pop, or lock.

Conditions

  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament
  • Bursitis – pes Anserive
  • Cartilage Injuries
  • Degenerative Joint Disease (Osteoarthritis)
  • Iliotibial Band Syndrome
  • Knee Sprains & Strains
  • Lateral Collateral Ligament Injuries
  • Loose Bodies
  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injury
  • Meniscus Tears
  • Osgood Schlaater Disease
  • Osteochondritis Dissecans
  • Osteonecrosis of the Knee
  • Patella Tendonitis
  • Patella Tendon Rupture
  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (Runner’s Knee)
  • Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury (PCL)
  • Quadriceps Tendon Tear
  • Unstable Kneecap

Treatments

  • Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair (ACL)
  • Arthroscopic Chondroplasty
  • Arthroscopic Meniscus Repair
  • Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation
  • Bilateral Knee Replacement Surgery
  • Cartilage Transplant
  • Computer-Assisted Total Knee Arthrhoplasty
  • High Tibial Osteotomy
  • JOURNEY II Total Knee Replacement
  • Knee Arthroscopy
  • Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL) Repair
  • Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Repair
  • Meniscus Repair
  • MPFL Reconstruction of the Patella
  • OCE – Repair of the Osteochondritis
  • Partial Knee Replacement
  • Partial Knee Resurfacing
  • Partial Menisectomy
  • Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Repair
  • Revision Knee Surgery
  • Subchondroplasty
  • Total Knee Replacement ~ VERILAST
  • Total Knee Replacement ~ VISIONAIRE
  • Uni-Compartmental Joint Repair

Conservative Treatments

The Orthopedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide conservative treatment options for Knee conditions and injuries.

Diagnosis

Physical Examination & Patient History

During your first visit, your doctor will talk to you about your symptoms and medical history. During the physical examination, your doctor will check all the structures of your injury, and compare them to your non-injured anatomy.  Most injuries can be diagnosed with a thorough physical examination.

Imaging Tests

Imaging Tests Other tests which may help your doctor confirm your diagnosis include:

X-rays. Although they will not show any injury, x-rays can show whether the injury is associated with a broken bone.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. If your injury requires an MRI, this study is utilized to create a better image of soft tissues injuries. However, an MRI may not be required for your particular injury circumstance and will be ordered based on a thorough examination by your Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic Orthopedic physician.

Treatment Options

Non-Surgical

If your tear is small and on the outer edge of the meniscus, it may not require surgical repair. As long as your symptoms do not persist and your knee is stable, nonsurgical treatment may be all you need.

RICE. The RICE protocol is effective for most sports-related injuries. RICE stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation.

Rest. Take a break from the activity that caused the injury. Your doctor may recommend that you use crutches to avoid putting weight on your leg.
Ice. Use cold packs for 20 minutes at a time, several times a day. Do not apply ice directly to the skin.
Compression. To prevent additional swelling and blood loss, wear an elastic compression bandage.
Elevation. To reduce swelling, recline when you rest, and put your leg up higher than your heart.
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines. Drugs like aspirin and ibuprofen reduce pain and swelling.

Surgical

If your symptoms persist with nonsurgical treatment, your doctor may suggest arthroscopic surgery.

Knee arthroscopy. In this procedure a miniature camera is inserted through a small incision. This provides a clear view of the inside of the knee. Your orthopaedic surgeon inserts miniature surgical instruments through other small incisions to trim or repair the tear.

Meniscectomy. In this procedure, the damaged meniscal tissue is trimmed away.

Meniscus repair. Some meniscal tears can be repaired by suturing (stitching) the torn pieces together. Whether a tear can be successfully treated with repair depends upon the type of tear, as well as the overall condition of the injured meniscus. Because the meniscus must heal back together, recovery time for a repair is much longer than from a meniscectomy.

Conservative Treatment Options

  • Non-Operative Knee Injury Treatments

Treatment Highlights

Innovative Implant Design

Smith Nephew JOURNEY II BCS knee is a second-generation knee replacement that combines the stability and natural motion of the human knee with new low-friction materials that may extend the life of the implant.

This Implant Technology is one of several innovative implant solutions  provided by Dr. Robert Detch of Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic.

Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic

The Orthopaedic physicians at Peninsula Bone & Joint Clinic provide comprehensive services to all members of the family.
Make An Appointment